Immigration Lawyers

GMXam

Registered
Also, don't assume it will happen in two years if you go the citizenship route, no matter how good they say they are. It's not up to them, it's all dependent on your judge and fiscal. Based on my friends, alone, seeking citizenship in the past 4 years, 4 of 12 attained it in 3 years or less...the rest are still waiting or took more than 3 years. 75% chance it will take longer than expected/estimated.
 

Ceviche

Registered
Rubilar is a citizenship lawyer, not an immigration lawyer. He would say this himself, Ceviche.
Correct!!

I also know a few people who have attained citizenship through Celano in less than the 3 years process by way of the residency route you quote from 2011. You may want to update your info.
Celano was 100% lost in 2011 regarding citizenship ( of course, he is/was a pro at residency - his main source of income in those days) when Dr Rubiliar was busy reading ancient Argentine law books and finding attainable solutions for foreigners in BA unable to get residency. Now Celano, "copies and pastes" Dr Rubiliars citizenship model and indeed has achieved some success till the new immigration laws were enforced.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Rubilar is a citizenship lawyer, not an immigration lawyer. He would say this himself,
As I noted in my previous post, Argentine law does not require legal representation to obtain residency and I'd like to add here that if you have temporary or permanent residency, you do not need a lawyer to obtain citizenship.

I cannot speak for him, but I think Dr. Rubilar would agree with the description that he's a lawyer who specializes in helping foreigners obtain citizenship when their immigration status is irregular. and, of course,he knows a lot about the laws regarding the requirements for residency (as granted by migraciones) in Argentina.

It's clear (as i have previously posted) that Dr. Rubilar has been a trail blazer in the process by which foreigners with irregular status can obtain citizenship. In spite of those who criticize him for keeping "professional secrets" (aka proprietary information for which he has invested a great deal of time and money), I have been very surprised how much information about the process that he has revealed here.

That information has undoubtedly made it easier for other lawyers to get on the citizenship for irregulars bandwagon.
 

Ceviche

Registered
As I noted in my previous post, Argentine law does not require legal representation to obtain residency and I'd like to add here that if you have temporary or permanent residency, you do not need a lawyer to obtain citizenship.

I cannot speak for him, but I think he would agree with the description that he's a lawyer who specializes in helping foreigners obtain citizenship when their immigration status is irregular. an, of course, he knows a lot about the laws regarding the requirements for residency (as granted by migraciones) in Argentina.

It's clear (as i have previously posted) that Dr. Rubilar has been a trail blazer in the process by which foreigners with irregular status can obtain citizenship. In spite of those who criticize him for keeping "professional secrets" (aka proprietary information for which he has invested a great deal of time and money) , I have been very surprised how much information about the process that he has revealed here.

That information has undoubtedly made it easier for other lawyers to get on the citizenship for irregulars bandwagon.
Couldnt agree more! Well said STEVE!

In fact Steve, allow me a moment to acknowledge you as well.. you were probably the first foreigner who actually raised the question - is it possible to become a citizen here without residency!
 

Juantime

Registered
So while bantering back and forth about the various merits or demerits of He Who Cannot Be Named, I choose to speak of personal experience which is think will provide context.

I first approached "Zero" in several years ago and set up a paid consultation over email as he was unwilling to answer basic questions online. At my appointed time, I arrived at his office building only to be told by a Chinese woman whose intercom manner was at best unprofessional, that he had a back problem and was not in the office. No apology given by Ming over email or his evil underling in the moment but I shrugged it off as cultural rather than professional.

When we did meet, I was ushered into a disused lab full of equipment and not quite what I was expecting (although ambulance chasing must involve forensics. Despite wanting to share the details of my case, I was ushered towards a framed price list which gave prices in US/thousands depending on the complexity of my criminal status. At the end of the consult, the 'secretary' asked me for 50% more than what had originally agreed to pay on email and only accepted my original fee when I provided a print out of the original email.

I then approached a lawyer friend who said to try applying myself with his guidance. I have been in the process for awhile near reaching the tail end which I think would be expedited by a lawyer's involvement but not the one in question. No bloody way. I have a friend who is currently employing him and the reports only confirm my suspicions- he wouldn't even release the file number to the petitioner- PROFESSIONAL SAUCE. I think he's a horrible little man and I want nothing to do with him. Vampiric, tango dancing scum.

If this info serves the expats then I'm happy. If the doctor could learn some professionalism from the above when dealing with people who seek his help, I'm happy for him to pay me a small consultant's fee and I would provide my Paypal address however I feel he's so tight he'd skin a fart.
 

ben

Registered
As I noted in my previous post, Argentine law does not require legal representation to obtain residency and I'd like to add here that if you have temporary or permanent residency, you do not need a lawyer to obtain citizenship.

I cannot speak for him, but I think Dr. Rubilar would agree with the description that he's a lawyer who specializes in helping foreigners obtain citizenship when their immigration status is irregular. and, of course,he knows a lot about the laws regarding the requirements for residency (as granted by migraciones) in Argentina.

It's clear (as i have previously posted) that Dr. Rubilar has been a trail blazer in the process by which foreigners with irregular status can obtain citizenship. In spite of those who criticize him for keeping "professional secrets" (aka proprietary information for which he has invested a great deal of time and money), I have been very surprised how much information about the process that he has revealed here.

That information has undoubtedly made it easier for other lawyers to get on the citizenship for irregulars bandwagon.
Nobody (I think) has any beef with the good doctor keeping his knowledge proprietary. Regarding legal approaches he has developed on is own, no one ever suggested he is obligated to or should share for free.

It is another story, though, when he has developed a record - parallel to and independently of the aforementioned good work he appears to have done - of spewing garbage, arrant nonsense, then habitually ducks behind professional secret as a one-size-fits-all dodge.

This ranges from the political (duh), to even questions near his core area of competency. Example (already repeated ad nauseam): Argentines living abroad can enter the country on a temporary basis on a foreign passport. This is the case for the past 20 years. The government says this - on the migraciones website and that of every Arg consulate in the world. Everyone knows this. Everyone does this. Notwithstanding this, the man basically said you can go to jail for that. And strove mightily to duck the question of whether to his knowledge has anything remotely similar ever happened. Only several pages into the debate, having been cornered by facts he clearly seemed not to be aware of at the outset, does he duck behind "professional secret".

And he's done this quite a few times - like when he asserted his authority and competence as a lawyer when declaring the position of the Constitution regarding the location of a ceremony the Constitution does not even mention (the ceremonial traspaso de mando and the brouhaha regarding where it should take place). People do know how to read, and it simply undermines the very authority and (impression of) competence he wished to rely on.

When you do that one time (or several times) too many, and get into the habit of replacing knowledge and information with insults, people start doubting you, not without reason.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Nobody (I think) has any beef with the good doctor keeping his knowledge proprietary. Regarding legal approaches he has developed on is own, no one ever suggested he is obligated to or should share for free.
This was posted in another thread on Sept 23rd (a thread in which you made several posts on Sept 24th) and I had it in mind when I made the comment about proprietary information (here is the entire post):

In my opinion, to withhold information on how to easily resolve an issue dealing with immigration on the grounds that it is a professional secret is selfish and mean spirited. I was licensed to practice law in several jurisdictions in the US (incl NY and Cal). Legal advice in a chat forum was not withheld simply for fear of losing business which is essentially what I suspect is here meant by maintaining a professional secret. There may reasons to withhold professional advice in a chat forum especially absent a disclaimer, but "professional secret" strikes me as odd.
Firstly, anyone in need of legal representation would generally not be capable or desirous of representing themselves. Secondly, disclosure of the magical get-out-of-jail-free professional secret doesn't automatically vitiate the need for legal representation. A lay person may know a legal rule but still benefit, if not, require professional assistance. That is especially true of expats who frequent this forum. Moreover, to the extent someone like Bajo uses this website to generate business (get clients etc ) I wonder whether it doesn't violate some rule prohibiting commercial activity here.

I'm not sure if the individual who made this post is aware of the fact that getting residency and citizenship for expats who have complied with the requirements does not require the assistance of a lawyer. Only those who have failed (refused) to comply with the requirements (which are not arbitrary and are easily understood) will find themselves in need of legal representation to deal with their situation.

Is the "good doctor always right? Perhaps not. None of us are, but it looks to me like he knows what he is talking about a very high percentage of the time.

As there's a huge difference between "s[background=rgb(252, 252, 252)]pewing garbage (and) arrant nonsense" regarding residency granted by migraciones and citizenship granted by the federal courts and the "good doctor's" political opinions. I wouldn't include them in the same sentence. [/background]

I agree with you that personal insults are a poor substitute for factual information and the "good doctor" occasionally has appeared to be a bit thin skinned when reacting to those who disagree with him, but, on occasion, those who disagree appear to engaging in personal insults as well, instead of taking the high ground and sticking to the facts.

Since I received first received my temporary residency in 2006 I have continuously stressed that the services of a lawyer are required only in extremely rare circumstances. I regard the work the "good doctor" is doing for those who seek citizenship without having residency granted by migraciones as "good" work, but I have never for a second thought his motives are altruistic.

PS: And if I ever do need a lawyer, I would not try to find one whose personality could be described as warm and bubbly.

PS2: Dr. Rubilar has shared "information on how to easily resolve an issue dealing with immigration " every time he has made the suggestion to "regularize your status" those who haven't.

It may sound "harsh" but if someone can't comply with the regulations of migracioes to obtain residency they have no "right" to stay in Argentina unless they seek citizenship.

Dr Rubilar isn't the only lawyer offering "citizenship representation" and no one is required to hire him. If anyone wants a lawyer who will hold their hand throughout the process, sing them to sleep at night, and change their diapers when they get too scared to hold it all in, the "good doctor" might not be the best choice.
 

Girino

Registered
As a lawyer, I suppose he gets approached when someone is in trouble or can foresee troubles, so he pictures the worst case scenario you might fall into (and finds a way to save your back). The fact that the law is arbitrarily applied here doesn't mean that you are safe as an illegal alien in Argentina. He works with clients who are in need of legal help, so he is not talking about mainstream cases.

When you hire a professional (a lawyer, a doctor, a consultant, etc.), you either trust him/her 100% or you don't. The worst thing you can do is to change your mind halfway - this could jeopardize the whole situation. Some matters are too complicated to explain to outsiders, that's why there are people specialized on them and you either trust them or not.

---
I did exchange a PM with him once about my situation, and he was extremely honest saying that my case was so straightforward I was good to go on my own (wife of a citizen) and it was of no interest to him.
I contacted him on another instance for a reference about a different legal issue and he promptly provided one.
 

wineguy999

Registered
PS: And if I ever do need a lawyer, I would not try to find one whose personality could be described as warm and bubbly.
But how about one who treats you with, if not respect, at least common courtesy? As has been stated a couple of times, Herr Doktor refuses to share information with his clients about their own cases - information which they are paying for.

If I want abuse from someone I'm paying, I think a dominatrix might be a more satisfying choice.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
If I want abuse from someone I'm paying, I think a dominatrix might be a more satisfying choice.
Yes, and there's no "might" about that one. :wub:

PS: I think the "good doctor" said it all when he said his job was to win the case.

Hopefully, after reading this and the related threads, anyone who is thinking about hiring the "good doctor" will already have a good idea of what to expect...and what not to.

In the long run, of course it's the final outcome that's most important.

One way or another, we all hope for happy endings.

 
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