Overstaying 90-day limit

steveinbsas

Registered
I just wanted to make sure please-I got here October 12th and have to go back to the States for work on January 26th (I will plan my residency after). So I can just show up at the airport even if I'm 14 days over and just pay a fee?
Yes, You can pay the $4500 peso overstay fee at the bank at the airport. If I understand correctly, the procedure is as follows: first you get a paper from migraciones, then pay the fee, then return to migraciones, and then check in for your flight. It is quite routine and nothing to worry about.

I will still be able to leave and catch my flight?
You should go to the airport at least a couple hours earlier than you normally would.If anyone reading this thinks you should go earlier than that I hope they'll post about it.

Be sure to pay the fee even if the airline employee who checks your ticket and your passport .before you're allowed to get in the check in line somehow misses the fat that you have overstayed your 90 day visa.

PS: The "overstay fee" is different from the 90 day "prorroga" that was mentioned in the post you quoted. The latter costs $2700 pesos but there is no reason for you to go to migraciones to get a prorroga. You will be paying the overstay fee at the airport.
 

Jakub

Registered
Hi Baexpats,
my extranjero DNI expired a few days ago (end of February), there was no way I could leave the country or ask for a prorroga. My Argentine wife and I are leaving for Europe at the end of March but before that, we want to go to Chile on a short holiday (March 7 to 14). If I pay the 2000 peso fine at Migraciones prior to entering Chile, will I be allowed to re-enter Argentina and stay for 8 or 9 days before I catch a flight to Europe? Thanks for your answers.
 

skibum801

Registered
I wanted to ask whether it's necessary to have a work contract before soliciting through the online form on the Migraciones website to get a work visa. This is because I don't yet have a contract (nor do I really anticipate getting one, as I'll be teaching English primarily). Migraciones would allow me to pay the $6000 ARS online, but I'm not sure if they'll ask me for a work contract afterwards. Could someone tell me if that's the case? I already sent an email to the Argentinian Embassy to the U.S., but just wanted to ask here as well.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
I wanted to ask whether it's necessary to have a work contract before soliciting through the online form on the Migraciones website to get a work visa. This is because I don't yet have a contract (nor do I really anticipate getting one, as I'll be teaching English primarily). Migraciones would allow me to pay the $6000 ARS online, but I'm not sure if they'll ask me for a work contract afterwards. Could someone tell me if that's the case? I already sent an email to the Argentinian Embassy to the U.S., but just wanted to ask here as well.

You cannot get temporary residency based on a job you don't have.

In other words (using yours, actually), Argentine migraciones does not issue "work visas" to foreigners who would then like to go job hunting.

If you pay the $6.000 on line I think you can kiss it good-bye if the fee is nonrefundable for denied "work visas" (aka temporary residency).

Given the fact that you posted this question in the overstaying the 90 day limit thread, it's worth asking if you will have overstayed your 90 day stamp by the time you will/would be going to migraciones in person.

If that's the case, you could find yourself in a bit of a pickle...as the new online system can also work as a "sting" operation to trap/trick "irregular" inhabitants into showing up at the offices of migraciones in person, saving migraciones officials thee trouble of tracking them down,

In other words (using mine, actually): DO NOT DO THIS!!

PS: Hopefully, you haven't already wasted your money getting an FBI report.
 
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Bajo_cero2

Registered
I wanted to ask whether it's necessary to have a work contract before soliciting through the online form on the Migraciones website to get a work visa. This is because I don't yet have a contract (nor do I really anticipate getting one, as I'll be teaching English primarily). Migraciones would allow me to pay the $6000 ARS online, but I'm not sure if they'll ask me for a work contract afterwards. Could someone tell me if that's the case? I already sent an email to the Argentinian Embassy to the U.S., but just wanted to ask here as well.
This is the best way to get a deportation order.
 

Bajo_cero2

Registered
You cannot get temporary residency based on a job you don't have.

In other words (using yours, actually), Argentine migraciones does not issue "work visas" to foreigners who would then like to go job hunting.

If you pay the $6.000 on line I think you can kiss it good-bye if the fee is nonrefundable for denied "work visas" (aka temporary residency).

Given the fact that you posted this question in the overstaying the 90 day limit thread, it's worth asking if you will have overstayed your 90 day stamp by the time you will/would be going to migraciones in person.

If that's the case, you could find yourself in a bit of a pickle...as the new online system can also work as a "sting" operation to trap/trick "irregular" inhabitants into showing up at the offices of migraciones in person, saving migraciones officials thee trouble of tracking them down,

In other words (using mine, actually): DO NOT DO THIS!!

PS: Hopefully, you haven't already wasted your money getting an FBI report.
When you go to the DNM they can arrest you without an arrest warrant.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
When you go to the DNM they can arrest you without an arrest warrant.
I "liked" this post but I hope those reading it understand that (in this context) it applies to someone who has overstayed their 90 day visa and goes to the DNM to apply for residency for which they cannot qualify.

This is apparently a not-so-accidental byproduct of making it possible for those without legal residency to apply for it on line and then be sucked into showing up at migraciones in person...only to find that they ate subject to arrest without an arrest warrant and deportation (without any judicial process?).

If you go to migraciones no more than 30 days after the expiration of your "first" 90 day visa you should be able to get a 90 day extension by paying 150% of the normal fee for the prorroga de permanencia (presently $2700 pesos).

If it's past the 30 "grace" period you shouldn't go unless you are applying for temporary residency and are very certain that you meet all of he requirements to get it.
 

skibum801

Registered
Yeah, so I haven't currently overstayed my 90-day tourist visa but I just wanted to ask the part about the contract. But that clears it up. I will not do the online process to do that, certainly! (Nor will I probably do it in-person, either, given that I don't qualify for a work visa).

Thanks for your replies!

I am actually currently thinking of leaving the country (Argentina) and going back to the States, as I'm not sure under which category I would actually qualify to get a temporary residency here in Argentina. I was thinking about doing a Master's degree down here, but honestly, it would almost be only so that I could get a student visa here, so that sounds stupid to me.

Anyway, yeah, I haven't overstayed my (tourist) visa yet, I just posted my question here because I didn't want to start a new thread, essentially.
 

steveinbsas

Registered
Hi Baexpats,
my extranjero DNI expired a few days ago (end of February), there was no way I could leave the country or ask for a prorroga. My Argentine wife and I are leaving for Europe at the end of March but before that, we want to go to Chile on a short holiday (March 7 to 14). If I pay the 2000 peso fine at Migraciones prior to entering Chile, will I be allowed to re-enter Argentina and stay for 8 or 9 days before I catch a flight to Europe? Thanks for your answers.
I seriously doubt you will have a problem reentering Argentina with your Argentine wife, but I suggest you also have "proof" of your travel plans for the end of March.

PS: The overstay fee is $4500 pesos, not $2000.
 

semigoodlookin

Registered
I had overstayed 4 years and went to migraciones. I had some concerned looks at first but as soon as they knew I was from the UK they just didn't care that I was here without a visa for nearly half a decade. This was last year. However, they cared in the airport and made it clear to me this was the last time, both when I left and came back. All of this is part of the problem here, if it is possible to be arrested it should be applied across the board. I increasingly find there is no right answer when it comes to this subject other than once you've overstayed things may go wrong.
 
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